Real Analysis

REAL ANALYSIS PART 2 CONTNUED : THE REALITY WE IGNORE AND THE COST OF THE SYRIAN REFUGEE CRISIS 5/5 (3)

ACT ONE

HOW A FAIRY TALE TURNED INTO A NIGHTMARE

Europe used to be an attractive destination for foreign students to study and continue their higher education. However, the past 4 years has seen a decrease of  foreign students enrolling in higher learning institutions in  France and Germany; study abroad programs and even tourism to key cities or Paris and Berlin. The overall concern of  student safety and country stability are the reasons many parents have considered sending their children to other European Union countries for university education , to America and Canada or further East to the prestigous engineering and medical schools in Ukraine and  Russia.  For which many European families are discovering that Ukraine , Russia and Poland offer the least expensive tuition cost for earning the first medical degree. This cost savings allows foreign parents to save money and later send their son or daughter to –yes!  an EU country to study for their medical specialization.

 

This author [ me ] never thought I would have to write about politics –about the Syrian refugee crisis –directly on this social site which primarily has a email subscribed audience of international students studying in the geography of the Former Soviet Union–FSU  Because thousands of Africans, Indians, Asian and Arab students currently study in the RSW  [ I will refer to the Former Soviet Union states and its geography as the “Russian Speaking World=RSW within this article and in future posts ] This is  a critical issue among foreign medical and engineering students who come from wealthy families that want them to further their education in Europe -BUT- do not want their son or daughter to be mistaken for a “refugee from North America” and thus treated as such.

Let’s examine the  beginning of the beginning of this refugee crisis in Europe.. we have to go back in history and  revist a fairytale optimism the  “Western Powers” had for  Syria–that Syria would be “pliable” and “reform minded” and compliant partner to American foreign policy.  This optimism began with a young educated couple.  Ironically , both were students of medicine and met while studyig medicine–much like most of our readers are studying medicine or engineering abroad in another country. The First Family of Syria is art of a family dynasty of absolute power–we can almost consider it like a Arab monarchy.  But what did the “West” fall in love with? was it the fact that both husband and wife of the new regime were educated in the West and spoke English with a “British” accent? Was it the fact that they were young and stylish. 

They shattered all sterotypes of how  Syrian First Family should “look”; dress and Western media persona –which was maticulously  crafted. 

The Al Assad family is the nucleus for understanding what is happening now in Syria and American foreign policy is another component which will be discusses in this massive article which will be pubished to you in “Acts”

this article is to be continued . . . .wait for it

Polo Mwonyonyi, Founder

Mwonyonyi Xoldingz Ukraine,

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Vinaya
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Democracy was reinstalled in 1991 in Nepal. When there was democracy in Nepal, the people in neighboring Bhutan were also enamored to struggle for democracy in their home country. Most of the Bhutanese who participated in democracy struggle were Nepali descent, therefore, Nepal government supported their cause. The result was terrible. Bhutan government deported 65 thousand people to Nepal. The refugee issue was even taken to the Un, but nothing happened.

Abdul Kader
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Syrian children and families have witnessed unspeakable violence and bear the brunt of the conflict. Hundreds of thousands of people have died, 5.1 million Syrians have fled the country as refugees, and 6.3 million Syrians are displaced within the country. Half of those affected are children.